You do not have to live with shoulder pain or lack of mobility.
At our office we treat a wide range of shoulder problems so that you can regain the strength and function you once enjoyed.

Most shoulder problems involve the soft tissue: tendons, ligaments, cartilage or muscles, although the bone can also be affected. At times, shoulder pain can be a symptom of a cervical spine condition that may require further diagnostic testing and treatment. We have experience in helping make the distinction between the two. Click on the conditions listed below to learn more:

Tendonitis and Bursitis

A common etiology of shoulder pain due to inflammation of tendons and the bursa sac of the joint, also called impingement syndrome. The treatment for this problem is often non-operative.

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Rotator Cuff Tears

The rotator cuff is a group of 4 tendons attaching to the upper humerus and is prone to tearing due to an acute injury or wear and tear. Pain and weakness are common symptoms. Some rotator cuffs tears can be treated non-operatively, the remainder often require arthroscopic repair. Irreparable tears may require reverse shoulder replacement.

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Labral Cartilage Tear

The labrum is an oval cartilage attached around the periphery of the shoulder socket. Tears in the labrum can lead to pain and problems with function, with some tears requiring arthroscopic trimming or suture repair.

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Biceps Tendonitis or Tear

The long biceps tendon courses in the front of the shoulder and attaches to the upper socket and labrum. Inflammation and tearing of this tendon can occur leading to pain and limited use. Non-operative treatment often resolves this condition.

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Frozen Shoulder-Adhesive Capsulitis

At times the shoulder joint capsule becomes inflamed and loses its pliability and elasticity, resulting in significant loss of mobility and the presence of severe pain. This condition often responds to physical therapy and other non-operative treatments.

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Dislocation-Instability

The shoulder joint has great mobility but at a price. The joint is prone to dislocate in some instances, usually with injury, and can become repetitively lax and unstable with even daily activities. Some patients can recover with a combination of exercise and activity modification, others require arthroscopic surgical repair to regain stability.

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Arthritis

The shoulder joint can develop the loss of cartilage on the humeral head (ball) and glenoid (socket) leading to arthritis and attendant pain and limitation. Many patients respond well to non-operative treatments although occasionally shoulder joint replacement is used to alleviate symptoms. We refer patients to a shoulder specialist with current experience in joint replacement surgery.

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